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Local History 

Yearbooks 

1949 



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INCTON 

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FORTY-NINE 





CLASS OF 1949 



WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 



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FOREWORD 



We, the class of '49, entrust in you, 
cherished Yearbook, the history of our class. 
When, in years to come, only memories remain, 
may we look to you for the key to the for- 
gotten era of our carefree high school days. 







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DEDICATION 



We, the class of Ninteen Hundred and Forty-Nine of 
Wilmington High School, dedicate this yearbook, "The 
Fortyniner," to Mrs. Stanley Webber, who, in her many 
years as a teacher and Junior Class Advisor, has won the 
deepest respect and admiration of all with whom she has 
come in contact. 



Those who have had the opportunity of receiving in- 
structions under her careful guidance can sincerely say 
that they have enjoyed every minute of it, and the class 
of forty-nine wish her the best of luck in future years. 







We, the Class of 1949, set aside this page 
of the Yearbook for Louise DeLisle, Because of 
unfortunate circumstances she was unable to gradu- 
ate with us, but she is not forgotten by her former 
classmates. 










TO THE CLASS OP 19 49 -Wilmington High School 

A milestone is a marker placed beside a highway to 
indicate how far you have gone along the road that you 
are traveling. It is not a stopping place. It does not 
indicate that you have finished your journey except when 
you have made up your mind to travel only so far. Even 
then it should only mark a resting point at which you 
plan for the next portion of the trip. One thing is 
certain, that is that you go either forward or backward. 
We seldom stay put by a milestone. 



Each graduating class arrives at one of these mile- 
stones in life's journey. Some members have already 
mapped their course and do not stop. Others who have 
been going along aimlessly may hesitate and stop to con- 
sider whether to continue on this road or to go back and 
try that side road, just passed, which seemed so attrac- 
tive. They decide to take a chance on that side road, 
and after following it for too long a time, they find 
that they have circled back to the main road again only 
much farther back from Opportunity Road than they were 
when they detoured. 

Life is like that. It is seldom, if ever, static. 
We are always going one way or the other. Even our 
excursions, which seem to be side trips, have taken up 
motion and precious time and have not advanced us on 
our real journey. We may be in motion but we have not 
progressed. 

KEEP MOVING FORWARD 

Stephen G. Bean 
Superintendent of Schools 




We, the class of '49, set aside this 
page for Mr. J, Turner Hood, our former 
principal. During his years at Wilmington 
High School, his understanding and guidance 
were an inspiration to all who were af- 
filiated with him. 



We hope, and know that he will prosper 
in any task which he might undertake. 



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It is a privilege to offer my sincere congratulations 
to each of you of the Class of 19% for having pursued to 
a satisfactory conclusion your high school studies. 

Like the n ^9ers n of a century ago, each of you faces 
a life fraught not only with uncertainty and danger but 
also with great opportunity — the opportunity to live 
triumphantly — the opportunity to live a life not of ex- 
pediency but of principle. 

Every member of the faculty will follow your careers 
with deep interest. It is our expectation that each of 
you will travel along your life's journey with distinction 
and honor. 



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HHH 





We, the class of 194-9* set aside this page for 
Anthony E. DeTeso, our instructor and coach for the 
past two years. 

We deeply regret his leaving Wilmington High 
School, and we wish him continued success with all 
things that he may undertake. 

We hope that his instructions, both in the class* 
room and on the athletic field, will be a great inspi* 
ration to all who know him* 






■^^H 




CLASS FLOWER: Poppy — emblem of glory 



CLASS COLORS: Green and Gold 



CLASS MOTTO: Success is 
secure while ambition 
prevails. 




HS 



F RCULiy 













Mr. Ralph Ambrose 



T&frC 7C ^2_<^ 



I think that I shall never see 
A man who teaches as well as he. 
he's the Sophomore's counselor 

and guide, 
And, also admired the whole 

school wide. 



Mrs. David Andersen 




Mrs. Andersen teaches the art 
class, 

Any of her drawings on exhibi- 
tion would pass, 

Who knows — some one of these days, 

She'll help one of her students 
their talents to display. 



Mr. James Dempsey _ 

<law4- £ ■ VJ^d&H 

From MrX/Dempsey you can /earw 
French and Latin, all you yearn 
He's as nice as he can be 
Alas, we'll miss him, wait and 
see. 







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Mr. Anthony DeTeso 

Now, Mr. De/Teso is strict 

and stern, 
From him your A's you have to 

earn. 
And never a greater coach was 

found , 
Within this mighty universe 

round. 



Mr. Joseph Donovan 

No high school faculty would 

be complete, 
Without Mr. Donovan, he can't 

be *>eat. 
He knows his English from A 

to Z 
And teaches us how easy it 

really can be. 



Miss Elene Farello 

Miss Farello is a scientist 

great, 
Whom we all appreciate. 
Her classes are held in the 

chemistry lab, 
Look outl or you're apt to end 

up on a slab. 



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.■.■■•■■ j .■■■**■ ■■ 






Miss Jacqueline Gleason 

Miss Gleason is quiet and so 

refined, 
She drives the "aints" out of 

many minds. 
She teaches her history very 

well, 
As any Freshman would surely 

tell. 



Mrs. Edward C. Manning 

Mrs. Manning is a friend 

indeed, 
Who came to us when we were 

in need. 
She taught the shorthand and 

typing class, 
To enable us our tests to 

pass. 



Miss Laura Marland 

Now, Miss Marland keeps you on 

your toes, 
Her English and history she 

really knows. 
She directed our play to help 

us display 
The talents we had which were 

hidden away. 




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Mr. Harold McDonnell 

Now, Mr. McDonnell can really 

Play, 
And teaches our musicians the 

right way, 
The high school band all think 

he's great, 
And with the rest of the school 

he also rates. 



Mrs. Donald B. Mcllvin 

Mrs. Mcllvin sings with sweetness 

and poise 
While the rest of us just make a 

lot of noise. 
She teaches us to follow her, 
Soon we'll really be able to purr. 



Miss Marie C. Moriarty 

She teaches us all the latest 

hops, 
So our popularity will always 

be tops. 
She helps lead the Freshmen on 

the right paths, 
And joins us all in our 

heartiest laughs. 









Mr. J. Wallace Plllsbury 



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Mr. Plllsbury, our new sub- 
master, 

Is good-natured ever after 

He helps us with our occupa- 
tions, 

So we may build a stronger 
nation. 



Miss Irene Sharp 

Miss Sharp is girls' coach for 

Wilmington High 
She makes all the rules look 

easy as pie. 
We'll never forget the day she 

came 
Our opinion of her was Just 

like her name. 



Mrs. Stanley Webber 

Now Mrs. Webbjer was away for 

awhile, 
And all of us missed her friendly 

smile. 
When she came back she was right 

in trim, 
And bubbling with laughter to 

the very brim. 







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Rosa Amaro 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 
Librarian 4 
Yearbook typist 

Usher committee for Senior play 
Hobby: Eddie 
Ambition: To be a success 
Pet Peeve: Getting up on cold 
mornings 



Jean Babine 



Commercial 2 
General 1, 3, 4 
Dancing 4 

Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Mixed Chorus 1, 2, 3 
Volleyball 4 
Softball 3, 4 
Senior play cast 
Yearbook staff 
Queen attendant 3 
Hobby: Dancing with Al 
Ambition: Comptometer school 
Pet Peeve: People who give 
sermons 



Paul Berrigan 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 
Drawing 1 
Boys 1 Glee Club 4 
Mixed Chorus 4 
Student Council 1, 2, 4 
Senior play cast 
Football 4 
Baseball 1 
Yearbook typist 
Hobby: Typing 
Ambition: To work in Lowell 
Pet Peeve: People who misbehave 
in class 






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Barbara Bertwell 

Commercial 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Girls' Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 2, 3, 4 

Knitting Club 4 

Candy committee for Senior play 

Hobby: Arguing with Billy ' 

Ambition: To be a success 

Pet Peeve: Being a man in plays 



Corinne Bigley 

College 1 

Commercial 2, 3, 4 

Yearbook typist 

Girls' Glee Club 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 3, 4 

Dramatic CJub 3 

Senior play cast 

Dancing 2 

Hobby: Writing children's 

stories 
Ambition: To live in Alexandria. 

N. H. 
Pet Peeve: People deciding whom 

you remind them of 



Pauline Blaisdell 

Commercial 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Camera Club Secretary 3 

Knitting Club 2, 4 

Advertisement and ticket 

committees for Senior play 



Hobby: 
Ambition: 

Pet Peeve; 



Sewing 

To go into business 

with Helen 

People who 3nap gum 

in my ear 






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Donald Blake 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Make-up slips 

Ambition: To go to college 

Pet Peeve: Detention 



Margaret Bourassa 

Commercial 1, 2 
General 3, 4 
Girls' Glee Club 4 
Mixed Chorus 4 
Hobby : Joe 
Ambition: Marry Joe 
Pet Peeve: Other boys 



Jean Boyd 



Jommercial 1, 2, 3, 4 

Cheerleader 3, 4 

Girls' Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 2, 3, 4 

Field Hockey 1 

Yearbook typist 

Secretary of Student Council 4 

Social Editor of Variety Staff 4 

Cueen attendant 3 

Class Will 

Knittirs Club 4 

Hobby: Seeine Ted 

Ambition: To live in a trailer 

Pet Peeve: Substitute teachers 





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Fred Cain 



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College 1, 2, 3, 4 
Yearbook staff 
Hobby: Cynthia 
Ambition: To be successful 
Pet Peeve: Getting up in the 

middle of the night 



George Calnan 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 



Baseball 1 

Hobby: 

Ambition: 

Pet Peeve: 



Racing people 
To have the fastest 
hot rod in the U. S, 
Giggling girls 



Paul Carpenter 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4 
Stage Manager for Senior play 
Substitute janitor 4 
Hobby: Barbara 
Ambition: To be successful 
Pet Peeve: Going to school 



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Raymond Carter 

Gener&l 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Gardening and fishing 

Ambition: To manage my own 

business 
Pet Peeve: Reading and writing 



William Chisholm 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 1, 2 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 
Student Council 1, 2, 
Oracle staff 3 
Vice-President 2 
Treasurer 4 
yearbook staff 
Hobby 



3, 4 



Ambition: 
Pet Peeve: 



Athletics 

To get married and 

raise a hockey team 

Stewy without a 

pencil 



Virginia Colucci 



College Y, 2 

Commercial 3, 4 

Knitting Club 2 

Yearbook typist 

Girls' Glee Club 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 3, 4 

Queen attendant 3 

Costume committee for Senior play 

Hobby: Knitting 

Ambition: Comptometer operator 

Pet Peeve: Sarcastic people 




Carolyn Cowhig 



3, 4 



Commercial 1, 2, 
Librarian 4 

Secretary of Dramatic Club 4 
Yearbook typist 

Candy committee for Senior play 
Hobby : Drawing 
Ambition: Private secretary 
Pet Peeve: People who chew gum 
in public 




Prank Darling 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Drawing 1 

Camera Club 2, 3, 4 

President of Camera Club 4 

Baseball 1 

Scenery, lighting, and sound 

committees for Senior play 

Hobby: Working on cars 

Ambition: To make a trip to 

Mars 
Pet Peeve: People who chew 

pencils 




Marie Dec 



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Commerclal 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Property committee for Senior 

Play 

Hobby : Red 

Ambition: To be a taxi driver's 

wife 
Pet Peeve : Thursday mornings 









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Robert Drew 

"-^{^-" 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 

Football 3, 4 

Drawing 1, 2, 3, 4 

Substitute janitor 4 

Ticket committee for Senior play 



Hobby: 
Ambition: 



Pet Peeve: 



Driving laundry 

trucks 

To be a coach and 

physical education 

instructor 

Quiet girls 



William Fabiano 

"ejt/" 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 

Football 3 

Baseball 3 

Basketball 3, 4 

Camera Club 4 

Hobby: Photography 

Ambition: To be a millionaire 

Pet Peeve: School 



Laura Ferguson 
" _>& " 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 
Girls' Glee Club 1, 
Mixed Chorus 1, 2, 
Yearbook typist 
Senior play cast 
Softball 4 
Dancing 4 
Hobby: 
Ambition: 
Pet Peeve: 



4 
2, 



Crocheting 
To be happy 
Racing drivers 






Howard Flynn 

College 4 
Hobby: 
Ambition: 
Pet Peeve: 



Photography 
To be a doctor 
People who borrow 
cigarettes 



Nancy Fullf ord 

College 1, 2 
Commercial 3, 4 
Girls' Glee Club 3, 
liixed Chorus 3, 4 
Cheerleader 3, 4 
Senior play cast 
Hobby : 
Ambition: 
Pet Peeve 



Don 

To go to Ireland 
My mother's saying, 
"And this is the 
baby of the family.' 



Anna Grant 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Girls' Glee Club 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 3, 4 

Cheerleader 3, 4 

Treasurer of Student Council 4 

Student Council 3 

Dramatic Club 4 

Softball 3 

Senior play cast 

Librarian 4 

Yearbook staff 

Valedictorian 

Hobby: Keeping busy 

Ambition: To go to college 

Pet Peeve: Catty women 




* 





Herbert Eadley 

General I, 2, 3, 4 

Boys 1 Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Nancy 

Ambition: To graduate 

Pet Peeve: Sitting behind a 

woman with a feather 

in her hat 



Patricia Lassiter 



College 1 

Commercial 2, 3, 4 
Class Secretary 2 
Librarian 4 
Cheerleader 4 
Yearbook typist 
Art 2 

Girls' Glee Club 3, 
Mixed Chorus 3, 4 
Senior play cast 
Hobby : 



Ambition: 



Pet Peeve: 



Watching televison 
at Margie's 
To be a successful 
career girl 
Sarcastic and un- 
reasonable people 



Loddy Leiter 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 
Librarian 4 
Girls' Glee Club 4 
Mixed Chorus 4 
Knitting Club 2 
Dramatic Club 3, 4 
Senior play cast 
Hobby: Dancing 
Ambition: To be a teacher 
Pet Peeve: People who chew their 
nails 






Lorraine Manson 



Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 

Girls' Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 2, 3, 4 

Knitting Club 2, 4 

Yearbook typist 

Class Prophecy 

Dancing 1 

Usher committee for Senior play 

Hobby: Making things for my 

hope chest 
Ambition: To own a home before 

I get married 
Pet Peeve: Substitute teachers 



Ka the rine Martin 



Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 

Yearbook typist 

Queen attendant 4 

Knitting C.lub 2, 4 

Costume committee for Senior play 

Hobby: Billy 

Ambition: To be a farmer's wife 

Pet Peeve: People who haven't 

got a sense of humor 



Catherine Martino 

Commercial 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Yearbook staff 

Basketball 2, 3, 4 

Field Hockey 2 

Camera Club 2, 3 

Class Treasurer 2 

Class Secretary 3 

Co-Captain Basketball 4 

Candy committee for Senior play 

Hobby: Talking 

Ambition: Learn to drive like 

Billy 
Pet Peeve: Current events 



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Albert Monte iro 

College 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Drawing 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Hunting and fishing 

Ambition: To be an accountant 

Pet Peeve : Teachers 



Walter Moreau 

College 1, 2, 3, 
Senior play cast 
Football 4 
Basketball 3 
Baseball 3 
Band 1, 2, 3 
Hobby: 
Ambition: 



Pet Peeve: 



National Guard 
To be a radio 
operator- 
Homework 



Louise Motschman 



Commercial 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Usher committee for Senior play 

Hobby: Traveling 

Ambition: Interior Decorator 

Pet Peeve: English 






Phyllis Muse 



General 1, 3, 4 
Commercial 2 
Camera Club 3 
Dancing 4 
Volleyball 4 
Softball 4 

Usher committee for Senior play 
Hobby: Dancing 
Ambition: Get a »ood job 
Pet Peeve: Giving current events 
in Problems class 



Kenneth Neagle 

'fry 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 
Boys 1 Glee Club 1, 2 
Basketball 2, 3 
Hobby: Hunting 
Ambition: To go to college 
Pet Peeve: Make-up work 



Eileen Nelson 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 

Class Secretary 4 

Dramatic Club 3, 4 

President of Dramatic Club 4 

Librarian 4 

Yearbook typist 

Carnival Queen 4 

Salutatorian 

Assistant Stage Manager for 

Senior play 

Hobby: Reading books 

Ambition: To meet new people 

Fet Peeve: Typing bulletins 






June Newhouse 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 
Knitting Club 2 
Girls' Glee Club 1, 3, 4 
Mixed Chorus 1, 3, 4 
Cheerleader 4 
Yearbook typist 

Candy committee for Senior play 
Hobby: Music and sewing 
Ambition: To become an actress 
Pet Peeve: People who crack 
their knuckles 



Richard Palmer 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 

Drawing 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Monkey-business 

Ambition: To get out of high 

school 
Pet Peeve: Homev/ork 



Helen Peitzsch 

*,&£&*<- " 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 

Yearbook typist 

Camera Club 3 

Cheerleader 3, 4 

Knitting Club 2, 4 

Osher committee for Senior play 



Hobby ; 
Ambition: 

Pet Peeve: 



Knitting 

Own my own florist 

shop 

People who say that 

sound like a little 

girl over the phone 



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Robert Fierce 

^^ 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Band 2, 3, 4 

Camera Club 3, 4 

Hobby : Boats 

Ambition: To be a Physicist 

Pet Peeve: Make-up slips 




P.ob6r 



ert Pipes 



College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Baseball 1 

Basketball 1 

Football 2, 3, 4 

Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Music 

Ambition: To graduate from 

college 
Pet Peeve: Noisy assemblies 





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Charles Riddle 






General 1, 2, 3, 4 

Football 3 

Boys' Glee Club 4 

Mixed Chorus 4 

Hobby: Women 

Ambition: To go to Bentley's 

Pet Peeve: Make-up slips 










Margaret Ridd±e 



Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 

Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 2, 3, 4 

Student Council 1, 2, 3 

Knitting Club 2, 4 

Class Essayist 

Costume committee for Senior play 

Hobby: George 

Ambition: To get at the top of 

a pyramid club 
Pet Peeve: "Carmen" 



Robert Ritchie 

College 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4 

Easeball 1 

Easketball 1, 2 

Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Sophomores 

Ambition: To go to Bentley's 

with Riddle 
Pet Peeve: Taking buses 



Margaret Rooney 



Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 
Yearbook typist 
Camera Club 1, 2, 3, 4 
Hobby: Dodging work 
Ambition: Joining the Air Force 
Pet Peeve: English classes 







Helen Rothwell 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 
Librarian 4 
Girls' Glee Club 3, 
Mixed Chorus 3, 4 
Dramatic Club 3, 4 
Senior play cast 
Volleyball 4 
Hobby: Sewing 
Ambition: To be a 
Pet Peeve 



nurse 



People who crack 
their knuckles 



Edward SadowskI 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 
Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
Basketball 1 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4 
Construction and scenery 
committees for Senior play 
Hobby: Rosa 
Ambition: To b6 a mechanical 

designer 
Pet Peeve: Business Law 



Robert Smith 
tin '+*,</ 



General 5, 4 

Scenery committee for Senior play 

Student Council 4 

Yearbook staff 

Hobby: Electrical work 

Ambition: To graduate 

Pet Peeve: Noisy study periods 






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Arthur Spear 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Class President 2, 3, 4 

Student Council 2, 3, 4 

Vice-President Student Council 3 

President Student Council 4 

Oracle staff 2, 3 

Variety staff 4 

Boys' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4 

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 

Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 

Property committee, Senior play 

Hobby: Athletics 

Ambition: Be manager of G. E. 

Pet Peeve: Foolish arguments 



Hobart Spring 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 
Senior play cast 
Football Manager 4 
Basketball 4 
Baseball 4 
Yearbook staff 

Hobby: Buying flashy clothes 
Ambition: To graduate 
Pet Peeve: Sloppy people who 
call me "Sloppo" 



Marjorie Joan Stevens 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Knitting Club 2, 4 

Volleyball 4 

Librarian 3, 4 

Candy committee for Senior play 

Hobby: Going to Maine 

Ambition: To go to college 

with Vonnie 
Pet Peeve: Staying in on 

Saturday nights 









Marjorie May Steven3 



Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 
Girls' Glee Club 3, 4 
Mixed Chorus 3, 4 
Softball 3, 4 
Basketball Manager 4 
Yearbook typist 
Knitting Club 4 
Dramatic Club 3 
Dancing 3 
Field Hockey 2 

Costume committee for Senior play 
Hobby: Collecting photo- 
graphs 
Ambition: Private secretary 
Pet Peeve: Rainy, days 



Norman Stewart 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Class Treasurer 3 

Variety staff 4 

Senior play cast 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4 

Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 

Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 

Hobby: Doris 

Ambition: To beat Chisholm's 

hockey team with our 

team 
Pet Peeve: The last bus 



David Sullivan 

General 1, 2, 3, 4 

Football 4 

Baseball 3, 4 

Boys' Glee Club 1, 2 

Hobby: Hunting 

Ambition: To be a playboy 

Pet Peeve: Homework 






.'•:'■' -I ' 






40% 



Edward Swenson 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 

Scenery, lighting, and sound 

committees for Senior play 

Camera- Club 2,3,4 

Baseball 2 

Hobby: 

Ambition: 



Pet Peeve: 



Photography and guns 
To photograph 
beautiful models 
Homework 



Alice Wagstaff 

Commercial 1, 2 

General 3, 4 

Camera Club 1, 2, 3 

Dancing 4 

Hobby : 

Ambition: 

Pet Peeve : 



Collecting sourvenirs 

To fly 

5th period study 



Mary Welling 

College a, 2, 3, 4 

Senior play cast 

Librarian 3, 4 

Girls' Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Mixed Chorus 2, 3, 4 

Cheerleader 3, 4 

Basketball 4 

Basketball Manager 2, 3 

Softball 3, 4 

Student Council 3 

Hobby: Typing 

Ambition: To be a successful 

teacher 
Pet Peeve: People who tell me 

I'm short 





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J 



Vonnie Wicks 

College 1, 2, 3, 4 
Knitting Club 2, 4 
Volleyball 4 
Librarian 3, 4 
Girls' Glee Club 3, 4 
Mixed Chorus 3, 4 
Softball 4 
Senior play cast 
Hobby: Going to Maine 
Ambition: To go to college 
Pet Peeve: People who snap their 
gum 



Theresa Yentile 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 
Softball 4 
Volleyball 4 
Yearbook typist 
Property committee for Senior 
play 

Hobby: Roller skating 
Ambition: To be a good typist 
Pet Peeve: First period short- 
hand class 



Joyce York 

Commercial 1, 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 2, 3, 4 
Co-Captain basketball 4 
Hobby: Sports 
Ambition: To be happy 
Pet Peeve: People who love tc 
tickle me 












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ONE DRV \N SCHOOL 



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l/V THE CLASSES 




HECESS 



flF f eR SCHOOL 






SEE- SAW 



MOST POPULAR 

BEST DRESSED 

BEST NATURED 

BEST ATHLETE 

BEST LOOKING 

MOST MISCHIEVOUS 

BEST DANCER 

MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED 

TYPICAL W. H. S. STUDENT 

MOST FLIRTATIOUS 

SHYIEST 

CLASS CLOWN 

BUSIEST SENIOR 

MAN HATER 

WOMEN HATER 

TEACHER »S RUIN 

CLASS PALS 



FAVORITE TEACHER 
MOST POPULAR JUNIOR 
MOST POPULAR SOPHOMORE 
MOST POPULAR FRESHMAN 



Anna Grant 
Virginia Colucci 
Jean Babine 
Catherine Martino 
Marjorie Joan Stevens 
Joyce York 
Jean Babine 
Anna Grant 
Eileen Nelson 
Nancy Full ford 
Corinne Bigley 
Jean Babine 
Anna Grant 
Carolyn Co whig 



Phyllis Muse 
Theresa Yen tile 



Florence Spear 
Cynthia Hale 
Janet Backman 



Arthur Spear 
Robert Pipes 
Robert Drew 
Arthur Spear 
Robert Pipes 
Norman Stewart 
Robert Drew 
William Chisholm 
William Chisholm 
Norman Stewart 
Raymond Carter 
Robert Pipes 
Arthur Spear 

Raymond Carter 

Robert Pipes 

Norman Stewart 
William Chisholm 

Mr, DeTeso 

Walker Spring 

Donald O f Connell 

James Tighe 



H 



"NO RHYME NOR REASON" 



Rosa Amaro 
Jean Babine 
Paul Berrigan 
Barbara Bertwell 
Corinne Bigley 
Betty Blaisdell 
Donald Blake 
Margaret Bourassa 
Jean Boyd 
Fred Cain 
George Calnan 
Paul Carpenter 
Raymond Carter 
William Chisholm 
Virginia Colucci 
Carolyn Cowhig 
Prank Darling 
Marie Dec 



Did you hear what Rosa said? 

She said "My favorite boy is Ed." 

By a certain boy Jean is sent 
I think his name is Alan Lent. 

In typing, Paul is very smart 
Likewise, when it comes to art. 

Barbara is friendly, and nice as well 
Just look at her and you can tell. 

Corinne is so very small 

She reminds me of a tiny doll. 

Betty has a nice personality, 
Full of fun and vitality. 

Some girls think he's rather cute 
Others think that he's a brute. 

Margaret's another with a beau 
Ask her boyfriend; he is Joe. 

Jean does her hair before going to bed 
To make sure it's always nice for Ted. 

Fred is a boy who's mighty smart 
Someday he'll own a motor mart. 

He has that mischievous look in his eyes 

I wonder what schemes he's about to surmise. 

In football, he helped to raise the score 
His inspiration was Barbara Moore. 

Raymond has been 0. K. from the start 

A very fine fellow with a friendly heart. 

Bill is always so very ail "reet" 
As an athlete, he's hard to beat. 

Ginny, you know,, is a talented knitter 
And best of all, her sweaters fit her. 

Carolyn studies long and hard 

That's certainly why she gets a good card. 

Frankie is such a quiet kid 

I wonder if he ever "blows his lid." 

Marie seems to have clothes galore 

I wonder if she owns a clothing store* 






Robert Drew 
William Pablano 
Laura Ferguson 
Howard Plynn 
Nancy Pullf ord 
Anna Grant 
Herbert Hadley 
Patricia Lassiter 
Loddy Leiter 
Lorraine Manson 
Katherine Martin 
Catherine Martino 
Albert Mcnteiro 
Walter Moreau 
Louise Motschman 



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Phyllis Muse 






FxSfi 


Kenneth Neagle 


Ar'tL ^T* 


Eileen Nelson 



Bobby is quite a busy man 

Maybe because of his girl, Joanne, 

Billy is always on the go 

He works down at the Reading show, 

Laura's quiet for awhile 

But when she gets started, you have to smile, 

Mr. Plynn is exceedinly prudent 

Wonder if that's why he's a married student, 

Nancy's frisky and she's gay 

As long as you say "No typing today," 

What do you think would rhyme with Anna? 
A little bird told me — "Anna Banana." 

Bert is very tall and lanky 
Nancy thinks he's pretty swanky. 

Pat is the girl with the Listerine smile, 
To see it you would walk a mile. 

Loddy 's face turns very red 

If there's anything wrong with what she said. 

Lorraine often seems to cut her hair 

To her, I guess, barbering is mighty fair. 

Kay is always rather groovy 

She sells candy at the Wilmington movie. 

Kay Martino is a pretty cute lass 
And she surely has plenty of class. 

Albert seems so very shy 
Who's the apple of his eye? 

Walter sure has plenty of zest 
I bet he'll be a great success. 

Louise is nice and also sweet 

Her hair is always shiny and neat. 

Phyllis gets dressed so neat and trim 
Especially when she goes out with Jim. 

I've never seen Kenny '3 face red 
Except when he's with a red head. 

Eileen Nelson is very "keen" 

Didn't she look cute crowned as Carnival Queen? 



IJMft 



June Newhouse 
Richard Palmer 
Helen Peitzsch 
Robert Pierce 
Robert Pipes 
Charles Riddle 
Margaret Riddle 
Robert Ritchie 
Margaret Rooney 
Helen Rothwell 
Edward Sadowski 
Robert Smith 
Arthur Spear 
Hobart Spring 
Norman Stewart 
Marjorie Joan Stevens 
Marjorie May Stevens 
David Sullivan 



June plays the organ and piano, too 
She's always ready to entertain you. 

Dickie is doing his best to strive 

So that he'll always be able to drive. 

Helen's so shy and friendly and quiet 

Her motto in cheering?--"I*m willing to try it." 

Bobby Pierce is quite the lad 
How many girlfriends has he had? 

Bobby's voice is worthy of praise 
May it last him the rest of his days. 

Charles seems a very good boy 
He really must be full of joy. 

Margaret's a Riddle, there is no doubt 

Both meanings are true, as we've all found out. 

Bobby is very neat and slick 
Wouldn't you like to be his chick? 

When Margy wants clothes, she goes to a tailor, 
When she wants love, she goes to her sailor. 

Helen has eyes of very deep blue 
I bet that she could be very true. 

He has no other girl for a pal 
For Rosa is his favorite gal. 

Smittie, I'm sure, almost never bets 

For he's just as wise as the rest of the vets. 

Presidencies keep Buster pretty busy 

It's a wonder all of it doesn't make him dizzy. 

Hobart Spring is quite the lad 

I wonder what happens when he gets mad. 

Last summer, when he got hot, 

To Kennebunk for a swim he'd trot. 

Margie has so many beaus 

She really must be on her toes. 

No one could ever say Margie's a snoot 
Don't you think she's rather cute? 

David has always been quite a riot 
When in class he's never quiet. 



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Edward Swenson 
Alice Wagstaff 
Mary Welling 
Vonnie Wicks 
Theresa Yentile 
Joyce York 



Ed may not have been good in geography 
But he sure knows 'bout photography. 

Alice has an Irish wit 

The gleam in her eyes is the proof of it. 

Mary T s a girl with lots of vim 

As one of the cheerleaders, she was might trim. 

Just call Vonnie the "Sanford Kid." 

Last summer in Main, ask her what she did. 

Terry's small, but efficient and fast 

You can be sure that she's no mere bombast. 

When trouble comes, it's "I don't care" 
But don't ask her "Do you dare?" 



SONG HITS 



Rosa Amaro 
Jean Babine 
Paul Berrigan 
Barbara Bertwell 
Corinne Bigley 
Pauline Blaisdell 
Donald Blake 
Margaret Bourassa 
Jean Boyd 
Fred Cain 
George Calnan 
Paul Carpenter 
Raymond Carter 
William Chisholm 
Virginia Colucci 
Carolyn Cowhig 
Frank Darling 
Marie Dec 
Rorbert Drew 
William Fabiano 
Laura Ferguson 
Howard Flynn 
Nancy Fullford 
Anna Grant 
Herbert Hadley 
Patricia Lassiter 
Loddy Leiter 
Lorraine Mans on 
Katherine Martin 
Catherine Martino 
Albert Monteiro 
Walter Moreau 
Louise Motschman 
Phyllis Muse 
Kenneth Neagle 



"I Have But One Heart" 

"I Chew And Chew My Gum" 

"Cool Water" 

"A Garden Of Roses" 

"An Apple Blossom Wedding" 

"Heart Aches" 

"You Were Only Fooling" 

"Just For Awhile" 

"Hair Of Gold" 

"Heart And Soul" 

"Kate" 

"The Matador" 

"I'll Get By" 

"Thousand Islands" 

"Jack, Jack, Jack" 

"I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" 

"You Call Everybody Darling" 

"Bella Bella Marie" 

"For He's A Jolly Good Fellow" 

"Feudin* And Fussin' And A Fighting" 

"Once In Awhile" 

"Daddy-O" 

"I'm An Old Cow Hand" 

"My Happiness" 

"Civilization" ,.: 

"Too Soon To Know" 

"An Apple For The Teacher" 

"Shave And A Haircut" 

"That Certain Party" 

"Billy Boy" 

"Am I Blue" 

"For Ever And Ever" 

"Confess" 

"Jimmy" 

"How Soon" 



Eileen Nelson 


"Oh! But It Happens" 


June Newhouse 


"I Want A Man" 


Richard Palmer 


"All By Myself" 


Helen Peltzsch 


"When You Were Sweet Sixteen" 


Robert Pierce 


"I'll Walk Alone" 


Robert Pipes 


"Pied Piper" 


Charles Riddle 


"Who— Me?" 


Margaret Riddle 


"Love, Love, Love" 


Robert Ritchie 


"Who Can Tell" 


Margaret Rooney 


"You Were Meant For Me" 


Helen Rothwell 


"Pretty Kitty Blue Eyes" 


Edward Sadowski 


"Rosa" 


Robert Smith 


"Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me" 


Arthur Spear 


"Margie" 


Ho bar t Spring 


"Beg Your Pardon" 


Marjorie Joan Stevens 


"The Lady From Twenty-Nine Palms" J 


Marjorie May Stevens 


"My Foolish Heart" j 


Norman Stewart 


"Long, Long Ago" 


David Sullivan 


"Woody Woodpecker Song" 


Edward Swenson 


"My Own True Love" 


Alice Wagstaff 


"Alice Blue Gown" 


Mary Welling 


"I'm A Big Girl Now" 1 


Vonnie Wicks 


"I'll Be Seeing You" 


Theresa Yentile 


"Love Somebody" | 


Joyce York 


"Pretty Baby" 


LEAST 


APT TO DO 


Rosa Amaro 


Miss a football game 


Jean Babine 


Stop chewing gum 


Paul Berrigan 


Be idle ~ I 


Barbara Bertwell 


Be a girl in a play j 


Corinne Bigley 


Be noisy | 


Pauline Blaisaell 


Have a fight with Helen 


Donald Blake 


Study every night 


Margaret Bourassa 


Go out with other boys 


Jean Boyd 


Agree with someone 


Fred Cain 


Be seen without a car 


George Calnan 


Drive slowly 


Paul Carpenter 


Have a change of heart 


Raymond Carter 


Speak to a girl 


William Chisholm 


Be bashful 


Virginia Colucci 


Stop typing | 


Carolyn Cowhig 


Stop taking shorthand 


Prank Darling 


Study French 


Marie Dec 


Wear the same dress twice 


Robert Drew 


Stop talking to the girls 


William Pabiano 


Own the Reading theater i 


Laura Ferguson 


Stay single 


Howard Flynn 


Be on time 


Nancy Fullford 


Be without a smile 


Anna Grant 


Get bad marks 


Herbert Hadley 


Be seen without Nancy 






■ 



Patricia Lassiter 
Loddy Leiter 
Lorraine Manson 
Katherine Martin 
Catherine Martino 
Albert Monteiro 
Walter Moreau 
Louise Motschman 
Phyllis Muse 
Kenneth Neagle 
Eileen Nelson 
June Newhouse 
Richard Palmer 
Helen Peitzsch 
Robert Pierce 
Robert Pipes 
Charles Riddle 
Margaret Riddle 
Robert Ritchie 
Margaret Rooney 
Helen Rothwell 
Edward Sadowski 
Robert Smith 
Arthur Spear 
Hobart Spring 
Marjorie Joan Stevens 
Marjorie May Stevens 
Norman Stewart 
David Sullivan 
Edward Swenson 
Alice Wagstaff 
Mary Welling 
Vonnie Wicks 
Theresa Yentile 
Joyce York 



Be unfriendly 

Stop talking about boys 

Let her hair grow 

Talk back 

Take the bus to school 

Get married 

Go steady 

Stop writing notes 

Be seen without Theresa 

Have his homework done on time 

Not study 

Stop dreaming 

Go to college 

Raise her voice 

Come to school every day 

Be quiet 

Read a book 

Be without a watch 

Stop blushing 

Have nothing to complain about 

Talk too much 

Change girlfriends 

Be in type class every day 

Stay in on Saturday night 

Pay attention in French class 

Stop talking 

Stop giggling 

Stop flirting 

Carry a book home 

Give up photography 

Lose her sense of humor 

Have untidy hair 

Be seen without Margie 

Grow any taller 

Be busy 



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JUNIOR CLASS 

In 19^-6 the present Junior Class entered the Wilmington High 
School. This class, at present, has almost completed its hard 
climb to the top. It has proven worthy and capable of succeeding 
in the road that is ahead, and, as our successor, to carry on all 
the traditions of Wilmington High School. 

In its Sophomore year the class elected as officers: President, 
Walker Spring; Vice-President, Richard Pilcher; Secretary, Florence 
Spear; Treasurer, James Landers; and elected four members to the 
Student Council: Roger Kambour, David Landers, Walker Spring and 
Richard Swain. . 

The officers chosen to lead the class in its Junior year were: 
President, Walker Spring; Vice-President, Richard Swain; Secretary, 
Florence Spear; Treasurer, Leo Woods. The class was represented 
in the Student Council by: Roger Kambour, Walker Spring, Richard 
Swain, Marcia Wiseman and Leo Woods. 





SOPHOMORE CLASS 



We entered Wilmington High School in September of 1947, with 
the main idea of obtaining a basic and fundamental education. 
During our Freshman year we did not elect class officers nor con- 
duct a class dance. However, the class did elect its members for 
the Student Council. The following members were chosen: Marilyn 
Lynch, Frank Warren, and Donald O'Connell. We ended our Freshman 
year in June and were on our way to a vacation. 

In September of 194B, after our vacation, we started our year 
as Sophomores. We elected class officers and members for the Stu- 
dent Council. They are as follows: President, Donald O'Connell; 
Vice President, John Tilley; secretary, Anne Frotten; treasurer, 
Dorothy Sharp. Student Council: Marilyn Lynch, Helen Calnan, 
Donald O'Connell, and John Cosman. 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 



CLASS OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Janet Backman 
Ralph Lepore 
Louise Moriarty 
Robert Hamilton 






We, the Freshman Class of 1949, have entered in the same con- 
fused way as those of the past. We are the largest class to come 
into Wilmington High School and probably one of the noisiest, but 
under the careful guidance of our Senior monitors we have escaped 
with very few, if any, offenses. 

We want to wish the Seniors the best of luck in any field they 
attempt. 



STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES 



Beatrice Boyd 



Bryant Bedell 



Ralph Lepore 




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FOOTBALL 



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First Row : Robert Drew, Robert Ritchie, Arthur Spear, Norman 

Stewart, Paul Carpenter, Co-Captain; Coach DeTeso, William 
Chisholm, Co-Captain; Robert Goss, Leo Woods, James Landers, 
Edward Sadowski. 

Second Row ; Coach Ambrose, Paul Gearty, Roger Kambour, Walter 
Horeau, Donald 0* Connelly James Mackey, Robert Surrette, 
John Chinn, Michael Elia, Robert Pipes, Richard Pilcher, Daniel 
Boylen, Frank Carta, David Sullivan, Robert Sheehan, Hobart 
Sp r i ng , Manag e r . 

Third Row ; Willis Whalen, Bryant Bedell, William Feeney, William 
Sanborn, Edward Gilbert, Harold Clements, James Tighe, Albert 
Fiorenza, Richard Rothwell, Paul Berrigan, Sheldon Solo, Robert 
Brabant, Lee Bull, Jere Melzar, James Starr, Fred Leverone, 
Ralph Lepore, James Haney, Albert Ethier, Glen Connolly. 



Wilmington High completed the best football season in the school 
history this year by defeating every opponent, allowing themselves to 
be scored upon only once. In addition to coming in second in the 
Class D race, they won the Lowell Suburban Football Championship. 

The team opened the season on September 25, by defeating Burl- 
ington 18-0. On October 2, they again took the field against an 
underdog Ayer team and brought forth a smashing 38-0 victory. Then 
the "Blue and White" matched their wits against a highly favored 
Dracut eleven and crashed through with a great 13-0 decision. They 
then easily defeated the Westford squad, 27-0. On the following 
Saturday, they defeated another favored team, Johnson, 12-0. Millis 
was downed the following week with a 33-0 score. On November 6, 
the squad met the toughest team of the year, Hanover. They eked 
out a 7-6 victory over this scrappy squad. Buster Spear scored the 
touchdown and Norm Stewart place-kicked the winning point. Finally, 
on November 11, came the day for which everyone had been waiting 
.... the day of the game with Tewksbury, their arch-rival. No- 
one was disappointed when the Wilmington victors emerged with the 
unbelievable score of 54-0. This was their first win over Tewksbury 
in 9 years. 

The season ended with Wilmington winning 8 games and losing 0, 
scoring 202 points to their opponents' 6. Paul Carpenter and Bill 
Chisholm gained first-string positions on the All-scholastic Class 
D Team. Bill Chisholm and Buster Spear were the high scorers for 
the year with 60 and 55 points respectively. 

Immediately at the conclusion of the Tewksbury game, the team 
and cheerleaders were honored by an invitation from Mr. and Mrs. Carta 
to attend a spaghetti dinner at their diner. Two weeks later the 
Rotary Club of Wilmington honored the squad with a large beef -pie 
luncheon. On January 3, 1949 the Police Associates gave a showing 
of sports pictures for the team. About three weeks later, on January 
22, the team and cheerleaders were invited to attend the Booster 
Club Banquet given in honor of the victorious football squad. Here, 
the members of the first team, 19 in number, received large W* s and 
a gold football on a tie clasp. The others received small W f s and 
gold footballs. The speaker at this banquet was Ray Riddick, coach 
of the Lowell High Football Squad. The American Legion on February 
16 invited the team to be their guests at a Sport's Night. At this 
event, they were presented with a beautiful trophy, designating them 
as the Lowell Suburban Champions. 

is the schedule of the '48 season: 

Played at: 

Wilmington 18 Burlington 

Wilmington 38 Ayer 

Dracut Wilmington 13 

Wilmington 27 Westford 

Johnson Wilmington 12 

Wilmington 33 Millis 

Hanover 6 Wilmington 7 

Tewksbury ........ Wilmington 54 



The following 


September 21 


October 2 


October 9 


October 16 


October 23 


October 30 


November 6 


November 11 



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Cheerleaders: Leaders-Nancy Fullford and Mary Welling; Jean Eoyd, 
Barbara Curtis, Anna Grant, Gloria Haney, Barbara Hendricks, 
Patricia Lassiter, June Newhouse, Helen Peitzsch, Florence 
Spear, Marcia Wiseman 

The first Cheerleaders* Dance was held on the night follow- 
ing our victory over Burlington, The attendance was large, and 
everyone had fun. The following week, the Cheerleaders* skit 
n Piglet n was presented. This humorous sketch was received with 
much applause and laughter. Added enjoyment was provided for by 
some of the male members of the Football Team, who demonstrated 
their ability as cheerleaders. More than 175 students and alumnae 
were present. 

The third dance was a Poverty Dance. This was a notable 
success also, with the majority of those attending, co-operating 
and wearing old clothes. 

The next few dances were plain and were attended by quite a 
number of students. The party that finished the season was the 
dance following Wilmington 1 s victory over Tewksbury. Admission 
was free and entertainment and refreshments were included. Once 
again the cheerleaders put on a comedy skit, written by Gloria 
Haney. The title of this was "Love Will Win" or "Who Will Marry 
Henrietta?" This comedy skit was enjoyed very much, and after- 
wards other entertainment was presented which included a Russian 
Dance by the DeTato brothers, an impersonation of Betty Hutton 
by June Bell, and a duet by Nancy Fullford and Marcia Wiseman. 



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BOYS 1 BASKETBALL 



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First Row: George Calnan, Captain-elect; James Fleming, Co-captain; 
Norman Stewart, Co-captain; Arthur Spear, John Chinn, Roger 
Payne, Frank Bonarrigo, Ralph Lepore, Glen Connolly, Manager. 

Second Row: Mr. Donovan, Coach; Malcolm McKenzie, Robert O'Neil, 
"Teo Woods, Mr. DeTeso, Coach; Arthur Brewster, William Fabiano, 
Albert Ethier, Mr. Ambrose, Coach. 



Considering their handicaps, the Wilmington Basketball Team 
came through with a fair season — winning 4 and losing 6. 

They defeated Lowell Vocational 3 times, and Howe High of 
Billerica once. Pacing the Blue and White's meager drive was 
Jim Fleming, next year's captain, with 108 points. "Buster" Spear, 
"Norm" Stewart, "Luke" Woods, and "Art" Brewster were the other 
starters for Wilmington. 




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GIRLS* BASKETBALL 



First Row: Ann Branscombe, Gloria Haney, Hazel O f Brien, Catherine 
Martino, Co-captain; Miss Sharp, Coach; Joyce York, Co-captain; 
Marcia Wiseman, Marie Chisholm, Barbara Froton. 

Second Row: Joanne Murray, Janet Condrey, Leona Porter, Anne Frotten, 
Deloris Cuoco, Joanne Reid, June Bell, Marilyn Lynch, Florence 
Spear, Nancy Reid, Marjorie M. Stevens, Manager; Mary Welling. 



This year*s 
team. The first 
though we lost, it 



basketball team was a hard working, high spirited 
game of the season was against Tewksbury, and al- 
didn f t dampen any spirit. 



For the second game of the season, Wilmington journeyed to 
Dracut. The spectators witnessed an exciting game. Wilmington* s 
final score came out one point behind Dracut, The third game was 
also with Dracut. The girls were enthusiastic over winning, but 
this time came out two points behind. The fourth game, Wilmington 
played against the Howe Champions, and held them off to a close 
score. The last two games were with Tewksbury and Howe, both close 
and exciting games. 



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•'■■"•■ '■'.. •'".'^."■^-^"•"'-^'■■.■ i; S'<:i>''. 



BASEBALL 



The 1948 baseball season was a successful one for the Wilming- 
ton nine. Paced by "Buster" Spear 1 s batting power and Tex Johnston 1 s 
pitching, the "blue" team emerged from the season with a ten and 
four record, losing twice to Johnson, once to Methuen, and once to 
Chelmsford. 



Wilmington's three pitchers gave a good account of themselves 
by striking out 147 of the opposing players. "Tex" Johnston struck 
out 101, "Bob" Goss-42, and Harold Puller-4. 

Wilmington started out the season with a 3-game winning streak 
only to have it cut short by a snappy Johnson nine. Following this 
defeat, Wilmington went on to defeat Punchard, Howe, and Tewksbury 
by scores of 2-1, 2-1, and 15-6. This streak was snapped by a deter* 
mined Chelmsford team which defeated the home nine by a 5-1 score. 
Then, after defeating Burlington, the "blue" nine lost two succes- 
sive games, one to Johnson 5-2, and one to Methuen 3-2. Wilmington 
finished out the season by defeating Punchard 9-4, Howe 7-6, and 
Tewksbury, our arch-rival in all sports, 21-0. 











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SOFTBALL 



First How ; Dorothy Fidler, Margaret Mooney, Miss Sharp, Coach; 
Janice Quandt, Lois Hollien. 

Second Row ; Beatrice Whalen, Elaine Christopher, Joan Hitchcock, 
Betty Kobylis. 

Third Row ; Joan Towski, Arlene Warsofsky, Mae MacLean, Janet 
Bacioiian, Jeanne Fenlon, Barbara Froton. 

Fourth Row ; Pauline Richard, Joan Brennick, Ruth Motschman, 
Margaret MacDonald, Shirley Smith. 

Fifth Row ; Shirley Froton, Wilma Coulter, Theresa Draper, 
Frances Brennick. 




VOLLEYBALL 



First Row ; Helen Rothwell, Marjorie J. Stevens, Vonnie Wicks, 

Miss Sharp, Coachj Jean Babine, Phyllis Muse, Theresa Yentile. 

Second Row ; Shirley Proton, Sadie Johansen, Ethel Henderson, 
Marjorie Mills, Wilma Coulter, Barbara Froton. 

Third Row ; Nancy Reid, Joanne Reid, Beatrice Swenson, Priscilla 
Lyons, Theresa Draper, 

The Volleyball team this year was divided into two teams, 
the Blue and the White. The girls practiced with much enthusiasm, 
three times a week. Unfortunately, for the girls, there were no 
outside games scheduled. But just as much enjoyment was derived 
by playing among themselves. 



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YEARBOOK STAFF 



Anna Grant 
William Chisholm 
Catherine Martino 
Hobart Spring 
Jean Babine 
Paul Berrigan 
Fred Cain 
Robert Smith 



Editor-in-Chief 
Assistant Editor 
Girls' Sports Editor 
Boys* Sports Editor 
Humor Editor 
Art Editor 
Business Manager 
Assistant Manager 




SENIOR TYPISTS 

First Row : Rosa Amaro, Theresa Yentile, Patricia Lassiter, Corinne 
Bigley, Jean Boyd, Margaret Riddle, Lorraine Manson. 

Second Row: Mrs. Webber, Laura Ferguson, June Newhouse, Marjorie 
May Stevens, Carolyn Cowhig, Paul Berrigan, Eileen Nelson, 
Virginia Colucci, Margaret Rooney, Helen Peitzsch. 



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■ 




STUDENT COUNCIL 

Miss Farello, Advisor; Arthur Spear, President; Leo Woods, Vice- 
president; Jean Boyd, Secretary; Anna Grant, Treasurer; Richard 
Swain, Walker Spring, Paul Berrigan, Marcia Wiseman, Bryant Bedell, 
Roger Kambour, Ralph Lepore, Beatrice Boyd, Donald O'Connell, Helen 
Calnan, Marilyn Lynch, Robert Smith, Norman Stewart, John Gasman 










VARIETY STAFF 



Marcia Wiseman 
Norman Stewart 
Arthur Spear 
Marilyn Lynch 
Jean Boyd 
Helen Calnan 
Donald O'Connell 
Arlene Fiorenza 
Robert Surrette 
Roger Kambour 



Editor-in-chief 

Assistant Editor 

Boys' Sports 

Girls' Sports 

Social Editor 

Polls 

Humour Editor 

Art 

Art 

Student's News 



■ ' 




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SENIOR PLAY 



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First Row ; Prank Darling, Frank Warren, Walter Moreau, Malcolm 
MacKenzie, Paul Berrigan, Norman Stewart, Hobart Spring, 

Second Row ; Helen Rothwell, Jean Babine, Corinne Bigley, Anna 
Grant, Mary Welling, Miss Marland, Laura Ferguson, Nancy 
Fullford, Vonnie Wicks, Patricia Lassiter, Loddy Leiter. 

Third Row ; Marjorie M. Stevens, Phyllis Muse, Barbara Bertwell, 

Jean Boyd, Marjorie J. Stevens, Robert Smith, Paul Carpenter, 
Robert Ritchie, Edward Swenson, Eileen Nelson, Carolyn Cowhig, 
Virginia Colucci, Catherine Martlno, Helen Peitzsch, Betty 
Blaisdell. 



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DRAMATIC CLUB 



First Row : Anna Grant, Carolyn Cowhig, Secretary; Eileen Nelson, 
President; Gerald White, Helen Rothwell, Loddy Leiter 

Second Row: Ralph Lepore , Jean LaRivee, Joan Towski , Miss Marland, 
Advisor; Patricia Blanchard, Kent Blaisdell 



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CAMERA CLUB 



First Row : Robert O'Neil, Arlene Wars of sky, Pricilla Lyons, 
Gloria Haney, Leona Porter, Nancy Trow, William Fabiano. 

Second Row ; Mr. Donovan, John LaCreta, Robert Pierce, Lawrence 
Foley, Guy Clinch, Edward Swenson, David Royce, Frank 
Darling, Edward Klements , Charles Crotty, John Cooke. 



■ 



The second annual semi-formal of 
the Grange Hall on February 4, 19^9. 



the Camera Club was held at 



Among the highlights of the evening were the coronation of 
the queen, Eileen Nelson, by 19^8' s queen, Katherine Jaquith, and 
the crowning of the king, Robert Pipes, by Frederick Johnston, 

king of 19^+8. 

The winners in a prize waltz contest were Cynthia Cornelieussen 
and her escort. Adding to the enjoyment were a few selections sung 
by Marcia Wiseman, Cynthia Cornelieussen, and Robert Pipes. Comedy 
was furnished by Raymond Carter, the court jester. 




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SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Frank Darling, Edward Swenson, John LaCreta 



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MOVIE PROJECTOR OPERATORS 



Fred Cain, David Landers, Guy Clinch, John LaCreta, Herbert Hadley. 



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BAND 



First Row: Robert Darling, Patricia Welling, Joyce Eaton, Ralph 
Ryan, Michael Rosa, Barbara Darling, Robert Cain. 

Second Row: Henry Daneco, Louise Moriarty, Constance Kambour, 
Frank Warren, Lester Smith. 

Third Row: James Douce tte, Joseph Landry, John Burke. 



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MIXED CHORUS 



First Row : Barbara Bertwell, Margaret Riddle, Marie Haley, Mary 
Crehan, Dorothy Harnish, Margaret Bourassa, Glenna Clifford, 
Ann Mackey, Betty Lou Grant, Beatrice Boyd, Constance Kambour, 
Mrs. McGilvin, June Newhouse, June Provost, Lucille Bourassa, 
Ruth Efraimson, Mary Welling, Nancy Fullford, Marion Sharp, 
Joan Brennick, Patricia Lassiter, Jean Tovey, Mary Cosman. 

Second Row : Daniel Boylen, Robert Belbin, Frank Carta, Lorraine 
Manson, Jean Boyd, Corinne Bigley, Ann Branscomb, Cynthia 
Hale, Marjorie M. Stevens, Lorraine Kitchener, Dolores Amaro, 
Donna LaDow, Marie Chisholm, Helen Rothwell, Loddy Leiter, 
Doris Pellerin, Margaret Mooney, Janice Quandt, Janet Backman, 
Emily Peck, Claire Moran, Barbara Draper, Adrienne McNicholl, 
Shirley Anstey, Roger Kambour, Malcolm MacKenzie, John Harvey. 

Third Row : Shirley Proton, Dorothy Sharp, Audrey Irwin, Betty 
Galka, Janet Colucci, Frances Brennick, Theresa Stewart, 
Dolores Landry, Louise McDevitt, Marylu Baxter, Beatrice 
Swenson, June Bell, Marilyn Lynch, Marcia Wiseman, Florence 
Spear, Ann Froton, Janet Condry, Vonnie Wicks, Virginia 
Colucci, Delores Cuoco, Marbara Connolly. 

F ourth Row : John Cosman, Charles White, Robert McHugh, Richard 

McHugh, Arthur Spear, Carl Backman, Lars Christianson, Peter 
Lepore, Hobart Spring, Richard Faulkner, Herbert Hadley, 
William Sanborn, Walker Spring, John Chinn, Paul Berrigan, 
Robert Goss, Charles Riddle, Robert Ritchie, Richard Swain, 
Rene LaRivee, Robert Pipes. 



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BOYS' GLEE CLUB 



First Row 



John Cosman, Robert Ritchie, Charles Riddle, 
Paul Berrigan, Mrs. McGilvin, June Newhouse, Robert 
Pipes, Hobart Spring, Herbert Hadley. 

Second Row ; John Carta, Charles White, Peter LePore, 
William Sanborn, Robert Belbin, Malcom MacKenzie, 
Roger Kambour, John Harvey, Robert Goss. 

Third Row : Arthur Spear, Robert McHugh, Lars Christiansen, 
Carl Baekman, John Chinn, Richard Faulkner, Richard 
McHugh, Richard Swain, Rene LaRivee, Daniel Boylen, 
Walker Spring. 




GIRLS* GLEE CLUB 



First Row : Marie Haley, Margaret Riddle, Mary Crehan, 

Dorothy Harnish, Margaret Bourassa, Glenna Clifford, 
Ann Marie Mackey, Betty Lou Grant, Beatrice Boyd, 
Constance Kambour, Mrs. McGilvin, June Newhouse, June 
Provost, Lucille Bourassa, Ruth Efraimson, Mary Welling, 
Nancy Fullford, Marion Shays, Joan Brennick, Patricia 
Lassiter. 

Second Row : Shirley Froton, Barbara Bertwell, Lorraine 

Manson, Jean Boyd, Corinne Bigley, Ann Branscombe, Cyn- 
thia Hale, Donna LaDow, Marie Chisholm, Marjorie M. 
Stevens, Lorraine Kitchener, Dolores Amaro, Claire Moran, 
Loddy Leiter, Doris Pellerin, Margaret Mooney, Janice 
Quandt, Janet Backman, Emily Peck, Barbara Draper, 
Adrienne McNicholl, Shirley Anstey, Mary Cosman, Jean 
Tovey. 

Third Row : Audrey Irwin, Dorothy Sharp, Janet Condrey, 
Frances Brennick, Dolores Landry, Theresa Stewart, 
Betty Galka, Janet Colucci, Louise McDevitt, Maryln 
Baxter, Beatrice Swenson, June Bell, Marilyn Lynch, 
Marcia Wiseman, Florence Spear, Helen Rothwell, Ann 
Froton, Vonnie Wicks, Virginia Colucci, Delores Cuoco, 
Marbara Connolly. 



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LIBRARIANS 

Helen Rothwell, Marjorie J. Stevens, Loddy Leiter, Vonnie Wicks, 
Mary Welling, Eileen Nelson, Carolyn Cowhig, Anna Grant 



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KNITTING CLASS 
Joanne Murray, Janet Colucci, Nancy Marshall, Miss Sharp, Nancy Reid, 
Marjorie M. Stevens, Margaret Riddle, Barbara Bertwell, Lorraine 

Mans on. 



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ART CLASS 



First Row ; Robert Clifford, Gerald White, LeRoy Ferguson, James 
Manuel, Albert Ethier. 

Second Rows Roger Kambour, Patricia Blanchard, Jean Blanchard, 
Tean Anderson, Mrs* Anderson, Lillian Guiffre, Joan Hodgdon, 
Arlene Fiorenza, James MacDonald, Weston Draper, Robert 
Hamilton, Lloyd Belbin, Robert Drew, Richard Palmer, Rocco 
DePasquale, Willis Whalen, Samuel Thorpe. 



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Mr, Louis H. Nichols 



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SUBSTITUTE JANITORS 



A crisis was clearly avoided when Mr. Call, Bobby Drew, and 
Paul Carpenter offered their services as janitors in the absence 
of Mr. Nichols. Devoting their time and energy, they faithfully 
kept the high school "spotlessly" clean and the furnace tended 
so that we would not have to wade through an accumulation of dust 
to our cold classrooms. 



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VALEDICTORY 

The story of our Flag is the story of our nation. It holds with- 
in its folds the story of struggles and accomplishments, of victories 
and losses, of dishonors and glories— it is the heart of America. How 
many of us have looked at the Flag and thought to ourselves, "There is 
the greatest and proudest Flag in the Universe, the symbol of American 
democracy and freedom. M And yet, how many of us know the history of 
our Flag? how it came to be adopted and what it means? Perhaps it 
would be safe to answer, "Not many." That is my purpose — to relate a 
history, the history of our Flag. 

Before the origin of "Old Glory", so" named by a skipper, William 
Driver, in 1831, the adopted flags of our Colonists contained the 
symbol of the wilderness in which they lived. There were rattlesnakes, 
beavers, pinetrees, and various other designs; flags bearing such mottoes 
as "Hope", "Liberty", "Appeal to Heaven", or "Don f t Tread on Me". The 
first flag of the colonies to bear any resemblance to the present 
national flag was the Grand Union Flag. This contained thirteen stripes, 
alternately red and white, representing the thirteen colonies, and a 
canton made up of the red cross of St. George and the white cross of 
St. Andrew, the King's Colors. It was at this time that the colonies 
were having so much trouble with their mother country, and that they 
accepted a flag having the British emblem in the upper left hand corner 
was proof that they were only protesting and not trying to break away 
from her. It was this flag that was carried on the flagship, "Alfred", 
on December 3, 1775 as the navy ensign of the thirteen colonies. On 
January 2, 1776, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, it was hoisted by 
General Washington as the standard of the Continental Army. Although 



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it was used many times before the Stars and Stripes came into being, 
it was never formally recognized by Congress. After the signing of 
the Declaration of Independence, the Grand Union Flag was, for obvious 
reasons, considered inappropriate for the colors of the newly inde- 
pendent thirteen colonies. Therefore, in May or June of 1776, as 
tradition has it, a group of three men, General Washington, Robert 
Morris, and George Ross, called upon Mrs. Betsy Ross, a flagmaker 
in Philadelphia. They carried with them a rough sketch of a flag 
which they requested her to make. This flag was similar to the Union 
Flag in that it still contained the thirteen stripes representing 
the thirteen colonies. However, the crosses of St. Andrew and St. 
George had been replaced by a circle of thirteen stars on a blue field. 
Thus, to Mrs. Ross goes the distinction of having made the first 
American Flag. Unfortunately, however, no records were kept and this 
story can be told only as a legend and not fact. Finally, on June 14, 
1777, the Continental Congress made a resolution Resolved that the 
flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; 
that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing 
a new constellation." Thus came the birth of our stars and stripes. 
Red is associated with strength and zeal; white with purity and clear- 
ness of life; and blue with loyalty, justice and truth; the stars 
symbolize dominion and sovereignty; certainly our ancestors planned 
their flag wisely. At first, the stars were arranged many ways. One 
of the most common was the circle, which some historians say expressed 
the hope that the Union would be never ending and all states equal. 
Other arrangements were horizontal rows of five stars each, or in 
staggered form, with five horizontal rows of three stars each. The 






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latter was the formation of the fifteen star and fifteen stripe flag 
that flew over Fort McHenry during the bombardment of the British in 
1814 and inspired Frances Scott Key to write the immortal "Star-spangled 
Banner." Soon after, more stars and stripes had to be added to include 
newly admitted states. By 1818, the number of states had increased to 
twenty; therefore, Congress passed a law which returned the number of 
stripes to the original thirteen and provided for the addition of a 
star for each new state admitted thereafter. In other words, "Every 
Star a State; Every State a Star." It is in the stars that we read 
the growth of our nation. By 1912, there were forty-six states, and 
it was in this year that Arizona and New Mexico reached their state- 
hood and our forty-eight stars attained. 

Thus our colors have a past, but what about its future? That is 
up to us. Our ancestors have handed down to us a heritage of which 
Americans can be proud. Their dreams and struggles for fulfillment 
have made cur country, and with it, its flag. It is up to us now to 
make its future. When one sees a flag, one sees not a flag at all, 
but the nation that made it and for which it stands. If the Flag could 
speak to us now, what would be its message? Perhaps it would say: 

"I am whatever you make me, nothing more, 

I swing before your eyes as a bright gleam of color, 

A symbol of yourself, 

A pictured suggestion of that big thing 

Which makes this Nation. 

My stars and stripes are your dreams and labors. 

They are bright with cheer, 

Brilliant with courage, firm with faith 

Because you have made them so out of your hearts 

We are all making the Flag. 

I am what you make me, nothing more." 



Anna Grant 



SALUTATORY 

Members of the School Board, Mr. Bean, Mr. Kambour, Members of 
the Faculty, Honored Guests, and our beloved Parents, tonight we wish 
to express our sincere appreciation for all the instructions and guidance 
we have received in our years of school. May we live up to our parents' 
and teachers' highest expectations and be a proud example of their confi- 
dence in us. To you all who have unstintingly given of your time and 
experience, may we show by the place we take in the future how we have 
absorbed your knowledge and American way of life. 

A CHALLENGE FOR THE FUTURE 

We have finished twelve years of supervised training and most of 
us are now prepared to enter the world of business and industry. What 
lies before us and what will we add to the great economic system of 
our country? The answer lies within each one of us. It is for us to 
apply our acquired knowledge and skills into molding ourselves into 
worthwhile citizens. 

America's idea of freedom is founded on a deep-rooted and abiding 
faith in people — that means all the people. Our entire history has 
followed this belief of granting more and more freedom to its people. 
There is no limit as to how high we may climb on the ladder of success 
in our attempts to satisfy our personal interests. We must recognize 
the rights of other people at all times. We must appreciate one of 
the fundamental requirements — everyone's individual differences in 
certain beliefs, creeds, and appearances. Even though these ideas 
are contrary to ours, we should treat them with respect. We. are all 
Americans, despite other inequalities, and this common bond unites 
us as no other could. 



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What a great distance we have traveled since our Pilgrim fore- 
fathers came to this land over three hundred years ago in search of 
freedom. This is a proud chapter in the history of the development 
of our country--one of continual struggle and sacrifice to obtain a 
far-reaching goal. Our birthright was the right to attain this goal. 

We have reached a time in our lives when we should think and 
act for ourselves. Our country of vast natural resources, its system 
of free enterprise, and its basic freedoms--freedom of speech, freedom 
of the press, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from 
fear — offers much to the eager, clear-minded individual. This unconquer- 
able spirit to achieve has been handed down through the years--a deter- 
mined spirit to make ourselves worthy of living in such a far-advanced 
country. 

We are the citizens of tomorrow and there lies before us no 
light task to be put aside until another day. If you have a secret 
ambition, the only way to achieve it is to work for it. What would 
have happened if the early American settlers had left their plows 
and homes and returned to the country of their birth? Persevering 
and diligent endeavors are rewarded by the supreme feeling of having 
contributed something, no matter how insignificant, to the advancement 
of our country. 

In a few years from now, it will be our undisputed right to vote 
on the political problems confronting our government. This is a privi- 
lege that was sorely won and hard fought for to keep. There is much 
we can do with this voting power to correct some of the evils now 
prevalent. Because we are a strong nation, we are not a perfect one. 
One of the largest problems is the world wide spread of Communism — 
the rule that takes away gradually every shred of human decency and 



reduces one to a state similar to slavery. We don't want that to 
happen here so we must use our weapons of democracy to prevent this 
evil growth from taking hold and suffocating all light of freedom. 
It takes the continual surveillance of everyone to detect the slightest 
sign of encroaching evils. 

Another grave difficulty is the existing slum areas and poor 
environments that hinder the work of training future citizens. There 
are innumerable fields that offer opportunities for improvement such 
as medicine, science, and industry. 

It accomplishes nothing to talk about these problems for that 
will not erase these blemishes from our record. It takes work and 
struggle and sacrifice. We are the pilgrims of tomorrow, building 
a new road for a better world — for a future world of peace and con- 
tentment. We are given this challenge, and it is our duty to be the 
trail blazers in the wilderness of doubts and prejudices. There 
stands before us this shining goal of opportunity and the right to 
pursue it. This is our challenge for the future. May we each do our 
part and arrive safely and victorious at our destination. 

Eileen Nelson 






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ESSAY 

Today, as never before the need for unity cannot be stressed 
enough; as we know, a foreign element is trying underhanded means 
to impose upon the people of these United States, an ideology 
which is nothing more than a fantastic dream of a few men. This 
doctrine has been imposed upon other nations not by choice, but 
by force alone. The tireless efforts of our noble statesmen in 
combating this evil menace is worthy of the highest of praises. 
Now, as in the days of our pioneer fathers, we are again ready 
to meet the challenge of a force which encourages only the evil 
and corrupt things of life. These are perilous times when great 
men ! s hearts are failing them with fear lest this foe make war on 
a God-fearing and peace-loving people. We find ourselves faced 
once more with a problem, whether men shall be free or slaves. 

Democracy comes forth as the shining light to set an example 
for the world; a government which was founded on Christian Unity 
and dedicated itself to the equality of men being a government of 
the people, by the people, and for the people. Democracy is liken- 
ed to the man with an objective as it will not be deterred from 
the principles that it was founded upon. The Constitution of the 
United States is the law which all men abide by, and was written 
for free men by free men. These men thought not of themselves, 
but for every American, who work side by side in every walk of 
life. The men in the north hew the lumber so that the men of the 
south can build fine, beautiful homes; they in return grow the 
cotton to make the warm clothes for the cold northern winters. The 



i 



west with their miles and miles of wheat fields have unlimited 
supplies of food with which to feed the north, the south, the east, 
and the west. We, the United States, are a country independent of 
all other countries; self-sufficient as a combined unit. 

In this land of ours, land of opportunity, where education 
makes no discretion as to race, creed, or color every student re- 
ceives the same advantages. There is no comparing these advantages 
with any other country in the world. Other countries seek not to 
educate their people but to suppress them. We know and can appreciate 
just what our education means to us. It gives us the chance to 
utilize the education in our everyday life, the way we act, the 
way we think, and the way we talk. We then in turn pass along to 
our children a way of life, a way in which they can live together 
as friends, as good neighbors, and as fellow countrymen, in a spirit 
of unity. 

The joy of living is in giving. The exhilarated feeling 
within onets heart is worth more than all of the gold in the world. 
We treasure this feeling, and set aside a part of ourselves in our 
daily life by giving something to those who are less fortunate 
than we are. The desire to help one another has long been an in- 
stitution in itself, of the people. Our motto today as in the past 
is M Do unto others, as you would have them do unto you." The progress 
forward of our country made by the aggressive citizens, speaks for 
itself the determination of the people. The outstanding leaders 
attribute their success to good, honest, hard work. These men had 
their objective in view, with this vision and a determined will 
strove toward their goal. Hardships and also sacrifices while attaining 



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that goal served not to deter them in their way, bat rather to 
urge them on, as barrier after barrier was overcome by sheer 
strength of character and the courage of their own convictions. 
These are the men who have proven beyond a doubt that our land 
is the land of opportunity. They represent the symbol of true 
Americanism, to go forward, to work hard, to be charitable, to 
speak as you feel, to worship as you please, and to write as you 
think. The standard of living in the United States, as we all 
know, is the highest standard of living in the whole world. This 
was made possible by our democratic form of government. The eagle, 
symbol of our government, stands forth as freedom reigns through- 
out America, and will always be there as long as there is breath 
in one American body. 

It is not a wonder that other nations look with greedy eyes 
upon the fertile soil, mining fields, oil fields, forests, rich 
waterways, and other extensive natural resources that we have 
exploited. Nations, unlike ourselves, who are lacking in ini- 
tiative, and with no aggressive spirit, have failed to take ad- 
vantage of the natural resources of their own countries; so, 
therefore are jealous and their only way of comparing their country 
with our country is by malicious propaganda and other subversive 
movements. The time has come, every one of us should repel this 
existing evil by ignoring radical minded people who have lost 
their way in life and whose views have become distorted because 
of their lack of intelligence to comprehend something which they 
do not fully understand. 



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The United States seeks only to help other countries torn by- 
war, sorrow, and grief, to regain once more their positions in the 
world and to. try to relieve the suffering and misery they have 
known for these many past years. Through the medium of the United 
Nations democracy is trying once more to have an everlasting peace 
throughout the world, and this peace can be accomplished by not only 
the unified spirit of the people of the United States, but the 
combined unification of spirit of the people of the world. 

Margaret E. Riddle 



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CLASS HISTORY 

Pew of us will forget that September day in 1945 when we started 
our first year of school in the Wilmington High School. Little did 
we know what problems would face us nor how we would combat them. Nov/ 
we have reached our goal and have supposedly been saturated with twelve 
years of education. What the future holds in store for us cannot be 
answered but, as for the past, those years in high school will forever 
be enjoyed in our memories. 

In 1945, we were faced with the task of adjusting ourselves to 
a different kind of student life. Eecoming a freshman was the first 
step in this readjustment program. As a group, the freshman class 
did not meet, but was proudly represented in the Student Council by 
Margaret Riddle, Paul Berrigan, and William Chisholm. We took an active 
part in the Curtis Magazine Drive which was held in school and gave 
good account of ourselves as salesmen. 

Upon entering our sophomore year, we were confronted with many 
new activities. Under the guidance of our capable advisor, Mrs. Webber, 
we elected our first class officers. They were as follows: President > 
Arthur Spear; Vice-President, William Chisholm; Secretary, Patricia 
Lassiter; and Treasurer, Catherine Martino. Representatives to the 
Student Council were Arthur Spear, William Chisholm, Paul Berrigan, 
and Margaret Riddle. 

In December, we were thrilled to hold our first dance and, as is 
always the occasion, was the best dance of the year. 

Under the direction of the Student Council, the Oracle" was printed 
and distributed to all students. It soon became known as the fastest 
means of spreading news throughout the school. 



This year we were happy to welcome Pat Las sit er, Corinne Bigley, 
and Bob Pierce, 

We entered our Junior year with a feeling of self satisfaction in 
being regarded as upper classmen. The class advisor was, once again 
Mrs, Webber. Our class officers chosen at the beginning of the year 
were: President, Arthur Spear; Vice-President, Anna Grant; Secretary, 
Catherine Martino; and Treasurer, Norman Stewart* Elected to the 
Student Council, from our class were: Arthur Spear, Vice-President; 
Mary Welling, William Chisholm, Anna Grant, and Margaret Riddle. 

This year we experienced quite a change in our faculty, with the 
addition of Mr. DeTeso, Mr. Rogers, Mr. Ambrose, and Mr. Donovan. 
Mr. DeTeso was appointed as head coach of football, baseball, and basket- 
ball, while Mr. Ambrose and Mr. Donovan were appointed as assistants. 

Socially, we became much more active, being hosts and hostesses 
at three class dances and joining the seniors in the Junior-Senior 
Prom, which was held at the Wakefield Boathouse. This undoubtedly 
was the greatest event of our social life in high school, and we were 
overjoyed to take part in such a gala affair. 

Under the leadership of Mr. Donovan, the Camera Club sponsored a 
successful Winter Carnival which was concluded by a semi-formal ball 
held at the Silver Lake Betterment Hall. 

During this year we voted to have the Purdy Studios as our class 
photographer and Dieges and Clust as our class jeweler in our senior 
year. 

Our class was made one greater with the addition of Laura 
Ferguson. 

Lead by the experienced guidance of Miss Marl and, our final and 
happiest year of school was begun. Prom the first day of our senior 






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year till the very end we found out that success could not be reached 
by taking short cuts. The class officers for this year were as follows: 
Arthur Spear, President; Paul Carpenter, Vice-President; Eileen Nelson, 
Secretary; and William Chisholm, Treasurer, Elected to the Student 
Council were: Arthur Spear, President; Jean Boyd, Secretary; Anna Grant, 
Treasurer; Paul Berrigan, Norman Stewart, and Robert Smith. Additions 
to our class were Hobart Spring and Howard Plynn. 

Again we were subject to a change in faculty with five teachers 
being replaced. Our new educational instructors were Mr. Dempsey, 
Mr. Pillsbury, Miss Moriarty, Miss Sharp, and Miss Gleason. At mid-year, 
Mrs. Webber was forced to leave us and we were all very sorry to see 
such a well-liked teacher depart from Wilmington High. She was ably 
replaced by Mrs. Manning. 

The football team, with Paul Carpenter and Bill Chisholm as 
co-captains, concluded its first undefeated season since 1939 and 
narrowly missed winning the converted class "D" Championship. At a 
banquet held in the Grange Hall, the lettermen and seniors were pre- 
sented with gold footballs and jackets, while the remaining members of 
the squad received letters and numerals. In regard to the football 
team, it would be appropriate to mention the fine support which the 
cheerleaders and townspeople gave to the boys. 

The Camera Club held its second annual Winter Carnival which lasted 
for one week. The final event, a semi -formal dance, was held at the 
Grange Hall. At the coronation of the king and queen, Robert Pipes was 
crowned King and Eileen Nelson crowned as the Queen. Taking part in 
the event from the senior class were Raymond Carter, Hobart Spring, 
and Katherine Martin, 



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For the first time in many years, the seniors, under the direction 
of Miss Marland, presented at the Grange Hall, a play entitled "The 
Fighting Littles." This affair proved to be such a success that we 
would not be surprised at all to see any one of our talented actors 
and actresses arrive in Hollywood. 

Once again, the Junior-Senior Prom proved to be the leading 
social event of the year. 

Now we look forward to graduation and reception. These eagerly 
awaited events will mark the end of our four years in high school. We 
sincerely thank all those who have added to our store of knowledge and 
happiness. Regardless of what may happen in the future, we shall try 
to keep in mind the wise teachings which our school instructors passed 
on to us. 

As for the class of 1950, we the class of 1949, wish you the best 
of success and happiness. We sincerely hope that your final journey 
through school be as unforgetable and enlivened as was ours. 

William Chisholm 



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CLASS WILL 

•0 

We of the distinguished Senior Class of the Wilmington High 
School, in the year of our Lord, Nineteen hundred and forty nine, 
being of strong "bodies and minds, do hereby swear this to be our 
last will and testament. 

TO THE SCHOOL we leave our memories of all the happy days we 
have had in it. 

TO THE TEACHERS we leave the hope that they will refrain from 
giving homework ' on the weekends. 

TO THE JUNIORS we leave the traditional bottle of tonic to give 
them pep and vim in order to carry on the*hard duties that all Senior 
Classes experience. 

TO THE SOPHOMORES we leave the hopes that you will work hard to 
attain the goal that we have now set before you as an example. 

TO THE FRESHMEN we leave our thanks to you for causing so much 
con jest ion in the halls on your first day in school, which enabled 
us to show for the first time, our authority as Seniors. 

TO ALL OUR FRIENDS outside of school we leave our sincerest 
thanks for your cooperation in making our four high school years 
successful. 

TO ROSA AMARO a megaphone so she'll be able to talk to Eddie 
louder than she reads her shorthand notes. 

TO JEAN BABINE a bottle of sparkle water to match her person- 
ality. 

TO PAUL BERRIGAN a set of curlers for his glamarous locks. 

TO CORINNE BIGLEY a canopener so Clyde will never have that 
undernourished look. 



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TO BETTY BLAISDELL we leave a rope to hold her and Helen to- 
gether for all the years to come. 

TO DONALD BLAKE a book on the Power of Persuasion, to help him 
to persuade the other boys to skip with him. 

TO BARBARA BERTWELL a box of vitamin pills so she'll be able 
to keep up with Billy. 

TO MARGARET BOURASSA a wild flower book to remind her of her 
happy hunting days in Biology. 

TO FRED CAIN a pair of spectacles, because his eyes always have 
that far-a-way gleam. 

TO GEORGE CALNAN a wrench to help him along with that constant 
fight against dilapidated cars. 

TO PAUL CARPENTER a pair of earmuffs so his ears will never get 
frostbitten. 

TO RAYMOND CARTER a set of gardening tools to encourage him with 
his hobby. 

TO BILLY CRTSHOLM we leave a handkerchief for the next time he 
and Flo have a little spat. 

TO VIRGINIA COLUCCI a medal for the work she did in order to get 
the yearbook typed. 

TO CAROLYN COWRTG we leave a spiral note-book so she'll always 
have a place to put special assignments. 

TO FRANK DARLING a telephone book to help him whenever he is 
looking for a date. 

TO MARIE DEC a taxi. We always thought she looked the happiest 
riding in one. 

TO ROBERT DREW a book of paper dolls to remind him of the days 
when he was still chasing them. 



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TO BILLY FABIANO a lantern ' cause the flashlight he uses in the 
show is awfully bright. 

TO LAURA FERGUSON a beginner's crochet book to remind her of the 
days when she was just a beginner, 

TO HOWARD FLYNN a pocket dictionary so he'll never be caught 
without the final word. ^ 

TO NANCY FULLFORD a lollypop to remind her of the days when'. 
Or was it a jellybean, Nancy? 

TO ANNA GRANT a beginner's book in shorthand to help her get an 
early start. 

TO BERT HADLEY a book on "Marshall" Law. 

TO PATTY LASSITER a crystal ball that will help her in her final 
decision to get a man for keeps. 

TO LODDY LEITER an Oscar Award for the marvelous performances 
she put on in the school plays. 

TO LORRAINE MANSON a ruler so she can measure Ralph now and then. 

TO CATHERINE MARTINO a basketball to remind her of the splendid 
job she did when playing basketball. 

TO KATHERINE MARTIN a chocolate bar so they'll never be without 
candy to sell at the Wilmington Theater. 

TO ALBERT MONTEIRO a package of cigarettes to coincide with his 
ni ckname • 

TO LOUISE MOTSCHMAN a baby carriage to help her with her baby- 
sitting jobs. 

TO WALTER MOREAU a box of coughdrops to remind him of the euca- 
lina in the Senior Play. 

TO PHYLLIS MUSE a ball for her champion ball playing. 

TO JUNE NEWHOUSE a mask so she can look serious once in a while. 



: Y V * 



TO KENNETH NEAGLE a course with Charles Atlas so he'll never 
have to worry about another fellow stealing his girl. 

* TO EILEEN NELSON a contract to write a book on her "Pleasing 
Personality." 

TO RICHARD PALMER a ticket to Woburn. It must be a long walk, 
Dicki 

TO HELEN PEITZSCH we leave the money for her fare to Wisconsin. 

TO ROBERT PIERCE we leave an airplane so he can take a home 
course in flying. 

TO ROBERT PIPES we leave a harmonica to keep him in tune with 
the world. 

TO CHARLES RIDDLE an alarm clock to remind him of the times he 
could not stay awake in class. . 

TO MARGARET RIDDLE another watch so she will always have the 
correct time. 

TO ROBERT RITCHIE a sheet of music 'cause we hope he'll further 
his career in that line. 

TO HELEN ROTHWELL we leave a tube of mascara to frame her 
beautiful eyes.. 

TO MARGARET ROONEY we leave a series of pamphlets on New York 
to remind her of her gallant struggle on the Class Trip Committee. 

TO EDDIE SADOWSKI a flower book on the care of "Rosas." 

TO ROBERT SMITH a bus so he can be depended on whenever trans- 
portation is needed. 

TO BUSTER SPEAR we leave a television set of his own so he 
won't have to bother his neighbors to see the fights. 

TO HOBART SPRING an extra long pencil so he won't be so apt 
to lose it. 









TO NORMAN STEWART a spelling book so he'll never forget his 
hundred per cents during seventh period. 

TO MARJORIE J. STEVENS a copy of that ever popular song, "On 
The Coast of Maine." 

TO MARJORIE M. STEVENS a pair of curtains" to put to use where- 
ever she thinks they are needed. 

^"T0 DAVID SULLIVAN we leave a can of green paint to cover his 
"blushing when a girl speaks to him. 

TO EDDIE SWENSON a Girl Scout honorary membership card to enable 
him to help them as much as he has the Boy Scouts. 

TO ALICE WAGSTAFF a special pass to go to any class in the high 
school to make up the work she missed when not in school. 

TO MARY WELLING a yard stick to help her to keep her twenty-five 
kids in line — pupils that is I 

TO VONNIE WICKS a car so she can take all the girls to Maine with 
her in the summer. 

TO TERRY YENTILE we leave a ladder so she can help her fireman 
boyfriend. 

TO JOYCE YORK a wig to cover up after the next time someone de- 
cides to cut her hair. 

APPROVED AND PUBLISHED by the Class of 1949, as ojir last Will 
and Testament. 

SIGNED, SEALED AND PRESENTED to the faculty, school and our 
friends. 

Jean Boyd 



PROPHECY 

It is now 1960 and Wilmington is celebrating its 230th anniversary 
by having the Darling & Hadley Circus in town. 

I called a cab to take me to the big event. When the taxi came, I 
recognized the driver as Billy Calnan . We picked up another passenger 
who happened to be Barbara Bertwell . I asked Barb if she was going to 
the circus, and she answered in the affirmative. We talked over old 
times and about our old friends. I learned that Margie Riddle now owns 
a jewelry store and has some beautiful watches to sell. She told me 
Jean Boyd was living a very dead life. She married an undertaker, you 
know. Phyllis Muse and Terry Yerftile own a florist shop just across the 
street from Jean's funeral parlor and are doing a lively business. The 
funeral parlor is an odd looking one. I believe it used to be a trailer. 

The cab took us to our destination, and as we entered, we heard 
someone shouting. It was Bobby Pipes . He was certainly making good use 
of his voice--he was the barker. He was crying, "Hurry, hurry, hurry. 
Step right up folks. See the world's most beautiful girls." I thought 
I recognized one of them, and asked Bobby if it was really Mary Welling . 
"Yes," he answered, "you must recognize the other girls." I did. They 
were Anna Grant . Vonnie Wicks . Patty Lassiter and Laura Ferguson . Boy, 
could they do the Hula Hulal As I walked around, I couldn't help think- 
ing how the Senior Play helped these girls with their stage careers. 

Next I noticed a sign which read " Flynn 's Wild Animal Show." Howard 
was now a success. After talking about this, Barb and I decided to go. 
I went over to buy the tickets, but didn't see anyone in the ticket box. 
That's funny. I looked again and then saw Kathy Martin . Won't people 
ever grow? 



■ 






We entered and sat next to a girl I hadn't seen nor heard from 
since high school. In fact, I never could hear her then. It was Rosa 
Amaro , still looking so neat and trim. She told me that Eddie Sadowskl 
and she were celebrating their tenth wedding anniversary. Eddie is 
making earphones for a local industry. 

The lights went out and the first act was on. This was a Bareback 
Rider's Act. Nancy Fullford always liked horses and now is in her glory. 
She is the star of the act. 

It was now time for the next act but no one appeared. We waited 
and waited. I looked at my program to see who was supposed to go on. It 
said Catherine Martino and Joyce York . Oh don't tell me — yes, they're 
still up to their old trick of skipping. They filled this act in with 
a girl who was always dependable, Eileen Nelson . Eileen is now through 
taking dictation; she's giving it. Yes, her act was amazing. She was 
dictating a letter to the monkeys. 

The show was over and they were cleaning up the place. Robert 
Ritchie was in charge of this job. They say he does a remarkable job, 
girls, and can be hired very cheaply. 

We left the show and were walking along when I heard a scream. A 
dog had been hit by a speeding car. The driver was Fred Cain. Someone 
said, "Make room for the doctor." I looked and noticed Billy Chisholm. 
He had become a success. He's the town's best veterinarian. His nurse 
is Loddy Leiter . 

We continued and noticed a little booth which had a sign on it. It 
said, "We take pictures any day, any time." It was operated by Alice 
Wagstaff . 

It was time for the Miss Wilmington Contest. As we reached the 
stand, they were just announcing the winner, who was chosen by Marie 



/.■;., 



Dec . It was quite a thrill for us to see Marie making this choice as 
she was just recently chosen Miss America. The winner was none other 
than Corinne Bigley . 

We could hear an orchestra playing. We went over and found it to 
be Walter Moreau and his Moonbeams. His vocalist was Louise Motschman . 

We left there and went over to see Jean Babine, the fortune teller. 
Jean told us she would look into her crystal ball and tell us what became 
of the rest of our class. She looked into the crystal ball and saw Paul 
Berrigan . He is now owner of Polly's Home Permanent s. His private 
secretary is Margie May Stevens . She goes into his office every morning, 
not to take dictation, but to curl his hair. 

Betty Blaisdell and Helen Peitszch now own a dress shop. They 
presented Margie Joan Stevens with an award for the best dressed chamber- 
maid of the year. 

Quite a few people are famous writers. Raymond Carter is now abroad 
writing poetry. Virginia Colucci types Carolyn Cowhig 's lovelorn column 
in Al Swenson 's newspaper. Norman Stewart is editor of the "Inquire" — 
the magazine for men. 

Margaret Rooney now operates the Dashund Bus Lines which specialize 
in weekend trips to New York. Robert Smith , David Sullivan and Donald 
Blake are bus drivers for this company. 

Wilmington High School has a new principal—a Mr. Paul Carpenter . 
Remember--he started as a janitor. Bobby Drew is following in his foot- 
steps—he's the sub-master. Buster Spear is taking Mr. DeTeso's place 
as coach. Here's hoping that he's as good a coach as Coach DeTeso. 

June Newhouse is still an organist. Her favorite hymn is "How Dry 
I Am." Her preacher is Reverend Charles Tupper Weeks Riddle , who refuses 
to baptise children unless they have simple names. 



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Billy Fabiano and Dicky Palmer are new owners of the Reading Theatre, 
while Bobby Pierce owns the Wilmington Theatre. How's competition, boys? 
Kenny Neagle operates the Silver Lake I. G. A. Store. Hobart Spring is 
manager of a new men's store. 

Helen Rothwell and Margaret Bourassa own a beauty studio. Helen is 
the hair dresser and Margaret is the manicurist. 

Albert Monteiro has built a small store in which he sells the furs 
that he gets from the animals he catches. Let's hope that he doesn't 
starve. 

It was getting late and we started home. When I retired that night, 
I couldn't help thinking how proud I was to have graduated with the 
wonderful Class of '49. 

Lorraine Manson 









"FAITH" 



You took my trembling hand, and held it tight; 

We made soft footprints on Life f s Sand, 
and through Fate ' s Night • 
I did not fear the suffering, the dismay, 

For you walked close beside me all the way. 
We smiled together; laughed throughout the storm; 

Though chill the weather, on us Love's Sun 
glowed warm, 
We fed to Life's cold winds the Grains of Time, 

And wandered, without aim, from clime to clime. 
This was the beauteous Life, the Age of Love; 

These times we knew no strife; felt not 
Fate's Glove; 
Always together, in Peace and Calm we walked, 

While Faith, the cradle of our sweet love rocked. 
And now you're gone; I no more feel your hand, 

Or see twin footprints marked upon the sand; 
Or know not fear, that devil, Black Dismay, 

Or hear your step beside me through the way. 
And I am lost; so lost and so afraid, 

Upon Fate r s Sea I'm tossed; within Care's 
Grave I'm laid, 
Come back, come back and once more let me know 

Our peace, our love, our faith—before you go. 

Louise DeLisle 



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In the long run 



You and your friends 

will prize the portrait that looks like 
you - your truest self, free from stage 
effects and little conceits. 
It is in this "long run" photography 
that P U R D Y success has been 
won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one 
cannot laugh at or cry over in later 
years. 

For present pleasure and future pride 
protect your photographic self by 
having P U R D Y make the port- 
raits. 



Pleasing Portraits 
Prompt Service 
Right Prices 



! 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER OF CLASS OF 1949 

PURDY 



Means Satisfaction Garanteed 



160 TREMONT STREET 



BOSTON 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO ALL W. H. S. STUDENTS 



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JEWELERS and STATIONERS 


TORRE'S 


M. F. CHARLES & SONS 


Reading Square 




Making Quality 


610 MAIN STREET READING, MASS. 


CANDY AND ICE CREAM 


TEL. REA. - 2-1566 


For over 34 years 


APEX RADIO SERVICE 




RADIO - BICYCLES - SERVICE 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


ALL WORK GUARANTEED 




88 HAVEN STEET, READING 


A FRIEND 


TEL. - 1119-R P. R. GUINAN 





The Class of '49 appreciate deeply the support given them by 



the people who have bought space in this year book. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



MOREAU'S VARIETY 

Grove Avenue, Silver Lake 

TEL. WIL. 362 



THE PINEWOOD GIFT SHOP 

470 MAIN ST., WOBURN 
When you have a Gift in mind, Keep us in mind. 


O'BRIEN'S PHARMACY 

W. H. O'BRIEN, Reg. Pharm. 
COR. MAIN & CAMPBELL ST. 

WOBURN, MASS. TEL. 2-0350 


GAVIN'S MARKET, INC. 

Groceries 

Ales, Wines and Liquors 

434 MAIN STREET 
TEL. WOB. 2-0427 WOBURN 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

SHOECRAFT SHOP 

New Shoes - Shoe Repairing 
410 MAIN ST., WILMINGTON, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

EATON BROS. 

TAXI SERVICE 

Stand, No. Wilmington Depot 
Tel. Wil. 2543 24 Hour Service 




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COMPLIMENTS OF 



HENRY BILLAUER 






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COMPLIMENTS OK 



JOHN C. ELIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE 
NICHOLS FUNERAL HOME 

GUY E. NICHOLS 

MIDDLESEX AVE., WILMINGTON 

TEL. WIL. - 744 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



MR. AND MRS. 
JOHN D. COOKE 



PINE RIDGE 
POULTRY FARM 

109 BALLADVALE STREET 

NORTH WILMINGTON, MASS. 

BOB. EVANS TEL. WIL. -474 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



DR. AND MRS. E. C. MacDOUGALL 

190 Middlesex Ave. 
Wilmington, Mass 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



DR. AND MRS. 
CHARLES H. BLACK, JR. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

EARLE S. HAMILTON 



CHARTER FLIGHTS 



FLIGHT INSTRUCTION 



SALES AND SERVICE 
BILLERICA - WILMINGTON AIRWAYS, INC. 



WILMINGTON, MASS. 



TEL. BILLERICA 940 



ARTHUR BOUDREAU 




FLORIST 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


RUSSELLS 5 LUNCH 


23 ADAMS STREET 


AND THE GIRLS 


TEL. WIL. 2109 

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COMPLIMENTS OF 

william e. Mclaughlin, inc. 

A. M. Woodside Ph. G., Mgr. 
THE REXALL DRUG STORE 

Main and Church Street 
Wilmington, Mass. 



WOBURN HARDWARE 


EDDIE LYONS 


& 


RANGE & FUEL OILS 


PLUMBING SUPPLY CO. 


JENNY STATION 


502 - 508 MAIN STREET 


312 MAIN STREET 


WOBURN, MASS. 


TEL. 539 


COMPLIMENTS OF 




WEINBERG'S DEPT. STORE 


WILMINGTON GRAIN 


WHERE QUALITY, PRICE 


AND FEED 


AND STYLE MEET 


MAIN STREET WILMINGTON 


THEATRE BLOCK 




WILMINGTON, MASS. 


TEL. 741 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ALTMAN'S INC. 

411 Main Street, Wilmington, Mass. 
Tel. Wil. 631 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



AMES NEWS 



MAIN STREET, WILMINGTON 



CLARK & CO., INC 


SILVER LAKE LUNCH 


LIQUORS - MEATS 


Grove Ave., Wilmington 


Main Street, So. Tewksbury 


"WHERE THE BOYS EAT" 


TEL. WIL. - 366 


TEL. WIL. 370 


WARD'S CUT RATE 


PAUL W. DAYTON 


455 Main Street, Woburn, Mass. 


MASTER ELECTRICIAN 


PATENT MEDICINES 


WIRING FOR POWER AND LIGHT 


TOILETRIES - HOUSEWARE 


126 BURLINGTON AVENUE 


GIFTS - GREETING CARDS 


WILMINGTON, MASS. 


SCHOOL SUPPLIES - TOBACCO 


TEL. WIL. 2284 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BYAM'S 

LAUNDERERS and CLEANERS 

408 MAIN STREET, WILMINGTON 

TEL. WIL. 2007 

WILSON STREET, NO. BILL-ERICA 

TEL. BILL. 874 







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COMPLIMENTS OF 

ART'S JEWELER 
OF WOBURN, MASS. 

"THE HOUSE OF FINER GIFTS" 



IDA'S STORE 




30 LOWELL STREET 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


WILMINGTON, MASS. 


Attorney David I. Elfman 


Full line of Groceries 


and Family 


Fresh Meats and Vegetables 


MIDDLESEX AVE. WILMINGTON 


Deliveries 


TEL. - 520 


TEL. WIL. - 374 




COMPLIMENTS OF 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


McMAHON FUNERAL HOME 


MALATESTA BROS. 


176 MIDDLESEX AVE. 


342 MAIN STREET 


WILMINGTON 


TEL. WIL. - 2081 


TEL. WIL. - 449 


GAS - OIL - ACCESSORIES 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



DR. MIRIAM J. HOSMER 






COMPLIMENTS OF 



Dr. GERALD A. FAGAN 

Clark Street, Wilmington 



Tel. Wil. 444 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



STEPHEN J. BEAN 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Mr. BLANCHARD 



SILVER LAKE HARDWARE 




MAIN AND GROVE STREETS 


XENAKIS' 


TEL. WIL. 2992 


X-LENT-DO-NUTSHOP 


QUALITY HARDWARE AT 


WOBURN. MASS. 


LOWEST PRICES 


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COMPLIMENTS OF 



DIEGES & CLUST 



73 TREMONT STREET 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1949 CLASS RING JEWELER 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 


V. H. CONWAY 


HOLLAND BROS. 


Main and Lowell Streets. 


BUS LINES, INC. 


Wilmington, Mass. 


BUSES FOR SPECIAL PARTIES 


Tel. Wil. -2311 


Tel. Woburn 2-0043 






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COMPLIMENTS OF 

FARRELL BROS. 

CONCRETE BLOCKS ANY COLOR DESIRED 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF 

CONCRETE GREENHOUSE SLABS 

CENERAL CONTRACTORS 

MASON WORK OF ALL KINDS 

Specializing in the Construction of Foundations 

TEL. - 761 RES. - 2931 or 2-7027 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



GILDARTS 
SERVICE STATION 



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TEL. 576 



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The systematic Savings Plan of this Co-operative Bank offers you one of the most convenient 
plans for the rapid accumulation of Savings. It helps you to save faster because of the regularity of 
your savings and the regular addition of liberal dividends to your account. Every dollar is constantly 
insured in full under Massachusetts Laws.This is the plan for you. Come in and start saving success- 
fully and profitably now! 

READING CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

643 Main Street Reading, Mass. 

Branch Office, Wilmington, Mass. 






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As you make plans for things which you want to buy or places you want to go, be sure that 
you also plan to save some money steadily. If this isn't done, your plans will become idle daydreams, 
because of insufficient money- Don't risk disappointment - - come in and start your Savings Account 
soon! 

MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

643 Main Street Reading, Mass. 

BRANCH OFFICE 

386 Main Street, Wilmington, Mass. 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

SILVER LAKE MARKET 

GROVE AVENUE, WILMINGTON - TEL. 470 

FREE DAILY DELIVERY 

Highest Quality Meats, Fruits and Vegetables 
at lowest possible prices 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


BRADBURY'S 




Wallpaper Headquarters 


HUNTLEY'S LUNCH 


"Kyanize" Paints - Venetian-Blinds 


MAIN STREET WILMINGTON 


Wallpapers Trimmed - Sanders - Steamers 

316 MAIN STREET 




OPP. TANNERS BANK WOBURN 2-2747 


CROSS'S SYRIAN GOLDEN 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


HAMSTERS 


LAKESIDE BARBER SHOP 


123 MAIN STREET 


MAIN STREET, WILMINGTON 


WILMINGTON, MASS. 


Clean and Modern 






COMPLIMENTS OF 

LOUIE'S 

Main Street, Wilmington 
Tel. Wil. 700 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE WOBURN FIVE CENT SAVINGS BANK 

19 PLEASANT STREET 

THE BANK WAS INCORPORATED IN 1854. 

PROMPT SERVICE ON MORTGAGE LOANS. 

ASSETS OVER $13,000,000 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COOMBS FURNITURE CO. 



FURNITURE 



RUQS 



464 MIDDLESEX AVE. 



NO. WILMINGTON, MASS. 



Tel. Wil. 51 J 






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COMPLIMENTS OF 



Mr. and Mrs. 



WILLIAM S. CAVANAUGH 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


Meats Vegetables Groceries 


WILMINGTON BUILDERS 


L G. A. MARKET 


SUPPLY CO. 


SILVER LAKE, WILMINGTON 


- 


TEL. WIL. 460 




SILVER LAKE APPAREL 




AND 


GEORGE'S 


GIFT SHOP 

93 MAIN ST. WILMINGTON 




DRY GOODS - CHILDREN'S WEAR 




Specializing in Gifts 




MRS. P. ROONEY, PROP. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ROGER BUCK GARAGE 

SPECIALIZING IN MOTOR TUNE UP 
UNITED MOTORS SERVICE 

460 MAIN STREET 
TEL. DAYS - 731 NIGHTS - 871 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



NO. WILMINGTON, MASS. 



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rural 



R0&9I 



FRED F. CAIN, INC 



580 MAIN STREET 



WILMINGTON 



TEL - 385 



CHRYSLER AND PLYMOUTH 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



C. S. HARRIMAN & SON 



TANNERS 




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COMPLIMENTS OF 

WILMINGTON DINER 

HOME COOKED FOODS 
PIES AND PASTRIES 

139 MAIN STREET, WILMINGTON 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




ADRIAN'S 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


FABRICS AND TRIMMINGS 




EVERYTHING IN FABRICS 


TA TTERSALL'S NEWS AGENCY 


TRIMMINGS, BUTTONS AND YARN 




STORES IN WOBURN 


SILVER LAKE - TEL. W1L. 352 


WAKEFIELD - MEDFORD 




COMPLIMENTS OF 


MAC'S SMOKE SHOP 




Formerly Scott's 


BUCK BROS. 


Mac Wegner, Prop. 




339 MAIN STREET, WOBURN, MASS. 


NORTH WILMINGTON 


' TEL. WOBURN 2-1656 




CIGARETTES - CIGARS - TOBACCO - CANDY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WILMINGTON COAL & ICE CO. 

COAL - OIL - ICE 
Williams Oil - O - Matic Burners Available 

TEL. WIL. 2021 












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COMPLIMENTS OF 



B. & M. Service Station 

H. ' Top' ' Marion & A. ' 'Rusty' ' Brabant 

Props* 

287 Main Street, Wilmington, Mass. 
Tel. 368 



TANNER'S NATIONAL BANK 



Woburn, Mass. 



Members of 



Federal Deposits Ins. Corp. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



BOB'S MARKET 



Burlington Avenue 



Wilmington, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CHURCH STREET HARDWARE 



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TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR LOW ALL PURPOSE 

LIGHT RATE 

Heat water and do your cooking electrically 

CLEAN - SAFE - ECONOMICAL - AUTOMATIC 

The way to BETTER living- electrically 

TOWN OF READING MUNICIPAL LIGHT DEPT. 

25 Haven Street - Rea. 2-1340 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CARTER & SONS 
SOCONY STATION 

Wilmington Center 
24 Hour Service 



LEARN beauty culture 

EARN steady income 

ENROLL NOW 

WlartAtfeM (Beauty Acadtrn^ 

*■ Moderate Tuition 

* Convenient payment terms 

* Day -evening part-time classes 
Ea 1909 * GI Approved 

< W\Ut . . today fox out eatalogut ana 
eomftCtti information 




673 Boylston Street - 125 Tremont Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 

34 Central Square - Lynn, Massachusetts 



11111 




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WILMINGTON, MASS. 



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